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31
ST1100 Archive of Wisdom / Carb Removal and Rebuild ( ST1100 ) *
« Last post by KoTAOW on August 03, 2014, 09:33:44 AM »
Submitted by Adam Frymoyer, STOC #949

~~~

Carb Removal and Rebuild ( ST1100 )

PART ONE:

If your reading this, youíre probably in trouble with your carburetors. I hope you checked everything possible and performed a proper diagnosis before digging into this project. Iím a diesel engine builder by trade and have owned many bikes over the years. Primarily ST1100ís. I've also worked in a friends motorcycle / small engine dealership for a good number of years and have tuned, rebuilt and repaired everything under the sun.  I've been doing this for a long time and hope that this will give some guidance on ST1100 carburetors. Remember that this is only a guide (and my opinion) to rebuilding ST carbs. My pictures and procedures may seem vague, but remember, this is only for a little re-assurance. Please follow the factory service manual for the proper way to work on your bike.

This particular bike, I acquired from an estate sale. I donít know the history of the bike, other than it sat for a long time. The previous owner never took care of the bike and it sat in a shed for 4 years while his estate was settled. It started right up and I drove it home. Soft on power, but it ran good.  With my busy schedule, it sat some more. Then the inevitable happened... The bike would fire right up, but only run on choke. The idle speed, slow speed and transitional circuits in the carbs were plugged. Time for a good carb cleaning and other maintenance while the carbs are out.

First things first, is to remove the bodywork needed to gain access to everything you will be doing. Seat, bags, top shelf, pocket panels and maintenance covers.












Next, will be removing air cleaner assembly.



Remove choke / enrichment cable and lay off to the left side of the bike.



At this point, some guys prefer to remove the fuel tank for easier access to the carbs. I never do. Just my opinion that itís just more stuff to take apart and put back together.

Next will be loosening the upper carburetor isolator / boot clamps. I started with #3 only because I was on that side. (right rear carb)  Use a brand new or a very good condition #2 Phillips screwdriver. Best to use a JIS driver if you have one, or purchase some early before you start. The screw heads are very soft and strip easily.






Next will be moving up to #1 carb. This is a tricky one. The clamp is usually loose and spun. Itís difficult to see and access. You may have to take another longer screw driver and rotate the clamp back into position to get at the Phillips screw head. I took the best pictures that I could, showing the angles of the driver and how to access. Youíll also have to move the coolant hose and wiring harness out of the way to get the driver down in there. Youíll also need a good bright flashlight to shine down from the top to see the screw head. As difficult as it seems, you should be in and out of there in less than 5 minutes.












After #1 is loose, I moved over to #2. Left front carb.



Then to #4, left rear. This one can be a little tricky too, getting the screwdriver between the frame and cylinder head. Again, use another driver to spin the clamp to get a good bite on the screw head.






Iíve had this pry-bar for years, and itís great for popping the carbs up and out of the boots. Donít pry on the float bowls, linkages, etc. I pry ďupĒ on the bottom of the plenum. Use the frame crossmember in front of the fuel tank to pry ďdownĒ on. Sometimes youíll have to give it a good heave, but theyíll pop right out.






Next will be removing the throttle linkage. Itís best to wait until the carbs are popped up and loose, so you can get at the screws easier. The bottom screw is blocked with the carbs installed.






Then tilt the carb bank off to the right side and disconnect the float bowl drain hoses. You donít have to slide the clamps down. The hoses will pull right off the nipples.



Disconnect the fuel supply hose from the vacuum / fuel shut down valve (if equipped). Just pull the hose going to the carbs. Leave everything else there to prevent fuel from spilling all over the place. Upon re-assy. I will be removing this valve and throwing it away.

After this is done also take the idle speed adjust cable and lay it over on top of the carbs now that the fuel lines are out of the way.



Move back around to the front of the carb bank, tilt the carbs upward and remove the fresh air intake hose going to the PAIR valves. You will more than likely have to cut it. The heat down in there welds / melts the rubber to the fitting. I had to cut mine.



The carbs are totally disconnected at this time. Pull them out. See all the mouse pooh and pee down in there? I removed the rubber heat shield and cleaned. While the carbs were out, I also removed the PAIR valves and replaced all the coolant o-rings, seals, hoses and clamps. Something to strongly consider while you have everything out.






32
ST1300 Archive of Wisdom / Replacing Garmin 2730 Touchscreen ( ST1100\ST1300 ) *
« Last post by KoTAOW on June 20, 2014, 06:12:50 AM »
Submitted by Don Feyma, STOC #237

~~~

Replacing Garmin 2730 Touchscreen ( ST1100\ST1300 )


I finally got around to replacing the touchscreen digitizer in one of my 2730's this morning.  All in all it was a pretty simple job.  Paying attention to detail helps.  Thought I'd take a few pictures along the way.  I got involved and didn't take pics of some of the steps,  so I'll try to get those when I replace the screen on my other 2730. I ended up with two of them when I bought for a pretty low price, another complete kit on closeout after my original screen went belly-up,  so when the other replacement screen arrives I'll end up with two working 2730's.  Yay!

UPDATE:  I've now replaced the digitizer screen on the second 2730 and updated this post with the additional pictures.  So, for about $48, I now have two seemingly brand new 2730's that are both working like new.  Such a deal!


OK, so here's how it goes.  Take your time and be patient and all will work out.

1.  Here's what you'll need -  1 Garmin 2730 (or any in that family of 2600 and 2700's),   a pair of tweezers,  a single-side razor blade, preferably new and sharp, a small but not tiny precision phillips screwdriver.  The size I used was size #0.   You'll also need a new digitizer screen, available here:  http://www.ebay.com/itm/261213216256?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1497.l2649




2.  OK, first turn the gps over so it's screen down.   Remove the 7 screws  indicated by the shaded ovals in the next picture.  They are difficult to remove from the holes, so just loosen them all the way so they're spinning.  They have little rubber washers on them so they won't fall out easily.



3. Flip the now-loose mounting base over - it'll remain attached to the front of the case.



4. Using some patience,  wiggle and tug the two case halves apart carefully.  I wouldn't use a tool for fear of damaging the gasket.  I used fingernails to help pry it apart.  Set the back of the case up. There isn't any need to take any connectors off, there is enough slack to work with it.   Now remove the four silver screws as indicated by YELLOW diamonds.  They don't screw into the circuit board, they screw into some silver metal tabs.







5.  Turn the entire unit over, and you can push the guts out of the front cover from the front.   There are two gaskets, the case gasket and the gasket that seals the screen.  I took these off and carefully washed them with a little dish soap and water, and dried them.  Set them aside for later,  but try to remember the orientation of them front to back.  I set them on the desk oriented with the front of the gasket toward the front of the screen, i.e. the upside goes toward the viewing side of the gps.



6.  The metal thing with the square thing on top of the unit is the antenna.  It's probably loose there and there is enough slack to move it aside.  Do so, or if you have to, remove the tape from the wires and move it away.  I didn't have to.



7. Carefully take off the piece of green tape covering the wires on the right side of the screen case and reserve it for later. Unplug the lead cable running from the old digitizer screen to the case.  Here's where you use the tweezers, if you haven't already used it on the silver screws.



8.  Then get out your razor blade and carefully and patiently cut the silicone glue that holds the old digitizer screen to the case.  Take small passes and try not to cut your finger off.





9.  Using your tweezers, or your fingers if you have little girly hands, plug the lead cable of the new digitizer into the outlet on the case.  I found that it was easiest to just lay the new screen in position and plug it in.  It does take some force to plug in, and a magnifying glass doesn't hurt either.





10. Use some Dust-off, or whatever, to make sure there is no dust or dog hair or other debris on the the gps screen, then remove the protective film from the back of the new digitizer screen.  Try not to get any fingerprints on the back of the digitizer screen or the video screen.



11. Remove the white liner from the adhesive strip on the back of the new digitizer and carefully line up the new digitizer screen and press into place. Replace the green tape over the wires.



12. Remove the protective film from the front of the new digitizer screen.  This part will be accessible for cleaning, so you don't need to worry as much about getting fingerprints on the front.

13. Put the screen gasket back in place in the slot provided on inside of the front case.  If you lost the orientation for this, the ridge on the gasket goes toward the front outside of the unit.



14. Press the unit back into the front of the case, making sure everything is seated correctly.   Replace the four silver screws.  Tighten but don't overtighten and strip the little tiny heads.  This sucks if you do it.

15. Carefully replace the case gasket into the slot in the back of the case front. Fiddle with it until it's seated correctly.  If you haven't already done so, make sure the antenna is correctly oriented at the top of the unit.





16. Replace the back of the unit and fasten the six black screws, again being careful not to overtighten and strip the heads out.  Flip the tilt adjustment mechanism back over and re-tighten that screw.

17.  Plug in the gps, turn it on and enjoy your brand new unit!



~~~

Thank You again for your contribution Don Feyma, STOC #237
33
ST1100 Archive of Wisdom / Replacing Garmin 2730 Touchscreen ( ST1100\ST1300 ) *
« Last post by KoTAOW on June 20, 2014, 05:45:31 AM »
Submitted by Don Feyma, STOC #237

~~~

Replacing Garmin 2730 Touchscreen ( ST1100\ST1300 )


I finally got around to replacing the touchscreen digitizer in one of my 2730's this morning.  All in all it was a pretty simple job.  Paying attention to detail helps.  Thought I'd take a few pictures along the way.  I got involved and didn't take pics of some of the steps,  so I'll try to get those when I replace the screen on my other 2730. I ended up with two of them when I bought for a pretty low price, another complete kit on closeout after my original screen went belly-up,  so when the other replacement screen arrives I'll end up with two working 2730's.  Yay!

UPDATE:  I've now replaced the digitizer screen on the second 2730 and updated this post with the additional pictures.  So, for about $48, I now have two seemingly brand new 2730's that are both working like new.  Such a deal!


OK, so here's how it goes.  Take your time and be patient and all will work out.

1.  Here's what you'll need -  1 Garmin 2730 (or any in that family of 2600 and 2700's),   a pair of tweezers,  a single-side razor blade, preferably new and sharp, a small but not tiny precision phillips screwdriver.  The size I used was size #0.   You'll also need a new digitizer screen, available here:  http://www.ebay.com/itm/261213216256?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1497.l2649




2.  OK, first turn the gps over so it's screen down.   Remove the 7 screws  indicated by the shaded ovals in the next picture.  They are difficult to remove from the holes, so just loosen them all the way so they're spinning.  They have little rubber washers on them so they won't fall out easily.



3. Flip the now-loose mounting base over - it'll remain attached to the front of the case.



4. Using some patience,  wiggle and tug the two case halves apart carefully.  I wouldn't use a tool for fear of damaging the gasket.  I used fingernails to help pry it apart.  Set the back of the case up. There isn't any need to take any connectors off, there is enough slack to work with it.   Now remove the four silver screws as indicated by YELLOW diamonds.  They don't screw into the circuit board, they screw into some silver metal tabs.







5.  Turn the entire unit over, and you can push the guts out of the front cover from the front.   There are two gaskets, the case gasket and the gasket that seals the screen.  I took these off and carefully washed them with a little dish soap and water, and dried them.  Set them aside for later,  but try to remember the orientation of them front to back.  I set them on the desk oriented with the front of the gasket toward the front of the screen, i.e. the upside goes toward the viewing side of the gps.



6.  The metal thing with the square thing on top of the unit is the antenna.  It's probably loose there and there is enough slack to move it aside.  Do so, or if you have to, remove the tape from the wires and move it away.  I didn't have to.



7. Carefully take off the piece of green tape covering the wires on the right side of the screen case and reserve it for later. Unplug the lead cable running from the old digitizer screen to the case.  Here's where you use the tweezers, if you haven't already used it on the silver screws.



8.  Then get out your razor blade and carefully and patiently cut the silicone glue that holds the old digitizer screen to the case.  Take small passes and try not to cut your finger off.





9.  Using your tweezers, or your fingers if you have little girly hands, plug the lead cable of the new digitizer into the outlet on the case.  I found that it was easiest to just lay the new screen in position and plug it in.  It does take some force to plug in, and a magnifying glass doesn't hurt either.





10. Use some Dust-off, or whatever, to make sure there is no dust or dog hair or other debris on the the gps screen, then remove the protective film from the back of the new digitizer screen.  Try not to get any fingerprints on the back of the digitizer screen or the video screen.



11. Remove the white liner from the adhesive strip on the back of the new digitizer and carefully line up the new digitizer screen and press into place. Replace the green tape over the wires.



12. Remove the protective film from the front of the new digitizer screen.  This part will be accessible for cleaning, so you don't need to worry as much about getting fingerprints on the front.

13. Put the screen gasket back in place in the slot provided on inside of the front case.  If you lost the orientation for this, the ridge on the gasket goes toward the front outside of the unit.



14. Press the unit back into the front of the case, making sure everything is seated correctly.   Replace the four silver screws.  Tighten but don't overtighten and strip the little tiny heads.  This sucks if you do it.

15. Carefully replace the case gasket into the slot in the back of the case front. Fiddle with it until it's seated correctly.  If you haven't already done so, make sure the antenna is correctly oriented at the top of the unit.





16. Replace the back of the unit and fasten the six black screws, again being careful not to overtighten and strip the heads out.  Flip the tilt adjustment mechanism back over and re-tighten that screw.

17.  Plug in the gps, turn it on and enjoy your brand new unit!



~~~

Thank You again for your contribution Don Feyma, STOC #237
34
RIP Don.

In the USA, as of Mar 2014, it looks like Motomachines carries carries the Hepco latches. Looks to be one of these:
http://www.motomachines.com/Latch-Assy-lid-to-case_p_706.html
http://www.motomachines.com/Latch-Assy-lid-to-case_p_707.html

Regards, John
35
ST1300 Archive of Wisdom / Homemade Jumper Cables with Quick Connect ( ST1300 ) *
« Last post by KoTAOW on January 08, 2013, 09:04:55 PM »
* * * Article pending permission by Author * * *

Submitted by T_C, STOC #XXXX
Original article can be found here:
www.st-owners.com

~~~

Homemade Jumper Cables with Quick Connect ( ST1300 )

Pair of homemade jumper cables and a quick disconnect on the bike side. After reading some of the horror stories and knowing the ST does not have the biggest reserve capacity, thought it best to be safe. Also did not want to get stuck with having the key in the ignition and not being able to put stuff away, so these I can just throw about anywhere. One time I had to get jumped when I was riding a Virago. Big pain in the rump there as you had to remove the battery to get to both terminals and then you had to disconnect a lead to slide it back in. Not again!

Used an Anderson PowerPole sbs50 for the quick connect. 50 amp continuous rating and the price was right (free). Had them leftover from some UPS battery packs. You can pick them up for $6 or so I do believe, one of the shops by me has 'em. Should be enough to handle a quick charge or the momentary surge of a starter. Left the end attached to the bike right under the battery box, used a boot on the back side and a dust cover on the front. Used a foot long piece of line fused at 80 amp for the hot, 6 gauge return is straight to the battery also.



With the dust cover open:


Clamps were from Wally land, marine world. Surprisingly good from what I can tell. Hopefully the plastic won't get brittle in cold. Will have to wait and see on that one I guess. The contacts on the inside were for only a 1/4" quick connect terminal. Not quite enough to handle a good solid high amp draw in my opinion. I soldered the main wire direct to one of the sides, then used the 1/4 quick connects to run a 12 gauge wire from one side of the clamp to the other. This will give both jaws some share of the power and assures a better electrical contact. You can see the wire between the handle in the picture. The mains were given some strain relief by using heat shrink to attach them to the handles of the clamps.


Wire is some 8 gauge, 80 amp fuse is housed right next to the battery. 6 foot long should give me enough room to get to where I can get in a place to yell CONTACT.


The overall bundle is pretty small. You will most surely notice that I used red wire for both positive and negative. Well, that was all I could find at a decent price. So the negative lead has a black piece of heat shrink every 6 inches and the last 6 inches of the wire next to the clamp are covered in black also.


Stowed under the seat they are ready for use. I think I need to get a Crown Royal bag to put them in. Nothing ruins a day like a dead battery, nothing makes a day like a little purple bag? Well hopefully they will be ready and available if I ever see anything cute needing a hand, or maybe anyone else too.


Keep the rubber side down and lend a hand when someone needs it...
Good day.

~~~

Thank You again for your contribution T_C, STOC #XXXX
36
ST1300 Archive of Wisdom / Re: (Stickie) AOW article pictures.
« Last post by Tom Melnik on January 08, 2013, 09:40:06 AM »
Update:

I have tagged each AOW article with a single * at the end of the title for the articles that I have successfully recovered the pictures or did not have any attached pictures.

Any article tagged with double **, means there are still missing pictures from other sources, other than Webshots.
37
ST1100 Archive of Wisdom / Re: (Stickie) AOW article pictures.
« Last post by Tom Melnik on January 08, 2013, 09:39:30 AM »
Update:

I have tagged each AOW article with a single * at the end of the title for the articles that I have successfully recovered the pictures or did not have any attached pictures.

Any article tagged with double **, means there are still missing pictures from other sources, other than Webshots.
38
ST1100 Archive of Wisdom / Zumo 550 Crazy Screen Repair - ( ST1100\ST1300 ) *
« Last post by KoTAOW on December 11, 2012, 08:22:06 PM »
* * * Article pending permission by Author * * *

Submitted by Dennis aka pretbek, STOC #XXXX
Original article can be found here: 
http://www.st-owners.com/forums/showthread.php?83056-Zumo-550-crazy-screen-25-repair-%28w-photos%29

~~~

Zumo 550 Crazy Screen Repair - ( ST1100\ST1300 )

The Zumo 550 GPS seems to have a tendency to have their digitizer go haywire, crazy and bonkers after a few years.
Signs of this are that there seem to be all kinds of phantom screen presses when you don't touch the screen, or it does not react when you do touch the screen (probably because there is a constant phantom screen press occupying the digitizer).

Solution 1: Give Garmin $150 to send you a refurbished Zumo.
Solution 2: Spend $25 on a digitizer from eBay and do it yourself. How-to is shown below.

I bought a Zumo 550 digitizer on eBay for $17 plus shipping. They also sell screens for about $50, you do NOT need that.
I also had to buy a Torx allen wrench ($5 for a pack of four different sizes, including the one I needed) that would be long enough to reach the recessed screws on the back of the Zumo. The Torx inserts that you snap into a screwdriver-style handle are not long enough.
In total I spent about $25.

For safety you could remove the battery, which I did.
Then undo all the torx screws in the back of the Zumo and pop the plastic cap off the top.
After that open it carefully, because the front and back half remain joined by the plastic connection leads of the digitizer and the screen to the PC board.

There is a rubber gasket clamped between the front bezel and the digitizer, It is probably a bit stuck to the digitizer by now, but it is not glued. Carefully take it off and clean it, it is probably dirty.

Undo the 4 phillips head screws that hold the metal screen casing to the front bezel.
Pop the screen/digitizer combo out of its metal casing.
Carefully pull the narrow (1/8" wide) brown plastic contact lead out of its "socket". The wide lead (1" wide) is of the screen, leave that in.



The digitizer is glued to the screen along the perimeter. Cut it loose with a slim, sharp knife like a razor blade. Or a kitchen knife.



After cleaning the glue residue off of the screen with something like Goo Gone, you can put the new digitizer on the screen.

The digitizer comes with a glue line along the perimeter and a protective backer on it.
Center the digitizer on the screen, make sure the contact lead is in the bottom right corner, then have the glue make contact.
Press along the perimeter to firmly adhere the digitizer to the screen.



To put the contact lead back in its socket, flip the brown tab up, then slide the lead in the slot and lock the brown tab down again.



Turn the Zumo on and try it out, it should work fine and dandy now.

Now turn it off again, reassemble and go ride!

~~~

Thank You again for your contribution Dennis, aka pretbek, STOC #XXXX
39
ST1300 Archive of Wisdom / (Stickie) AOW article pictures.
« Last post by KoTAOW on December 03, 2012, 04:02:34 PM »
There are a lot of articles in the AOW section that contain pictures that have been previously uploaded to Webshots. Over the years, it made sense to upload them to Webshots vs. st-riders.net.

Unfortunately, Webshots has been bought out by another company who is currently moving everything to another server.

Before the Webshot pictures were moved, they were downloaded and will eventually be uploaded to the st-riders.net server for safe keeping.

In the mean time, this means that some of the AOW articles will lose their attached pictures, until the KOTAOW can edit the articles and reference the correct links back to the pictures.

This is a Winter 2012-2013 project.  There are currently 178 ST1100 articles and 109 ST1300 articles.  This requires a lot of work.

Please be patient the next several months, while the editing process continues.

Thanks.
40
ST1100 Archive of Wisdom / (Stickie) AOW article pictures. *
« Last post by KoTAOW on December 03, 2012, 04:01:50 PM »
There are a lot of articles in the AOW section that contain pictures that have been previously uploaded to Webshots. Over the years, it made sense to upload them to Webshots vs. st-riders.net.

Unfortunately, Webshots has been bought out by another company who is currently moving everything to another server.

Before the Webshot pictures were moved, they were downloaded and will eventually be uploaded to the st-riders.net server for safe keeping.

In the mean time, this means that some of the AOW articles will lose their attached pictures, until the KOTAOW can edit the articles and reference the correct links back to the pictures.

There are currently 178 ST1100 articles and 109 ST1300 articles. 

Please be patient the next several months, while the editing process continues.

Thanks.
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