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41
AudioVox Cruise Tutorial ( CCS-100 ) - ST1100\ST1300 - continued

After re-verifying point-to-point wiring was OK, +12VDC signals was measured to the board connector, the diaphragm and chamber held vacuum, and the board showed no evidence of damage; energizing the solenoids indicated the vac solenoid was stuck. After several hits with 12VDC, it loosened itself up. A drop of light machine oil in each port, connect it back to the bike, lock the throttle at 3000 RPM, hit on and set, voila!, all valves actuated. This could work. Re-assemble the servo, reset dip switches to the default mode, hook everything up, test ride and... it's alive! The CC works; on, set, accelerate, coast, off when brake is applied, resume; it's all there. Yea!!! Sometimes it takes digging deeper to solve the problem.

Here is what I learned during this process:
  • Be careful disassembling the servo, tabs are easily broken off, especially the diaphragm chamber. I used five small metal tabs to take the top off. Go slow.
  • When mating the the lower and upper servo halves, place the three small o-rings into the solenoid ports and not to the chamber tubes. It makes for effortless seating and the tabs click together easier. Once again be careful and work slowly, you don't want to break any of those tabs.
  • Take your time in routing the wires and don't be afraid to cut the excess off. Routing the harness out of harms way pays off big. Loom your wires to prevent exposed wires.
  • When looming and using the cowl stay (frame) as a routing & anchor point, it is best to assemble the inner cowling. I had to re-position the wiring slightly and to the inside so it could slip past and meet with the main outer cowl. The convoluted tubing adds protection but also adds bulk.
  • After all the plastic was on, I noticed the vent opening where the mirror meets the fairing and thought of all the dust, grime, water, and insect ingress that could potentially wreak havoc to the electrical connections and servo so I chose to block it off. A plastic folder bought at Staples provided the right thickness and was trimmed and placed between mirror and fairing.

Well that's it. Fabricate a bracket and it's time to ride; I want to test the CC on its staying power on a long trip.











~~~

Bracketing done, project finished!

I brought the bike up to 75mph and with the modest slopes and valleys of our North TeXas highway system, the speed has held remarkably steady. When, with future maintenance, it is required to remove the airbox I will look at adding a vacuum canister but for now I am incredibly happy that the unit functions at it should.

Ride safe.





~~~

Thank You again for your contribution Paul Wilhelm, aka NikonHonda, STOC #8598
42
ST1300 Archive of Wisdom / AudioVox Cruise Tutorial ( CCS-100 ) - ST1100\ST1300
« Last post by KoTAOW on June 08, 2012, 07:03:34 AM »
Submitted by Paul Wilhelm, aka NikonHonda, STOC #8598
Original article can be found here:  http://www.st-owners.com/forums/showthread.php?112500-Need-opinion-on-CC-wiring-re-do

~~~

AudioVox Cruise Tutorial ( CCS-100 ) - ST1100\ST1300

When I bought my 2004 ST1300, the Audiovox CC was not working so I tied up the wires and told myself it was for another time. The bike is at rest for three weeks so I decided to upgrade the headlamps and move the lights off the forks to the mirror area but that is for another post. I had all the plastic off and I looked at the CC and decided it was time.

Having experience in electro-mechanical assembly, I am meticulous in looming and routing wires in a tidy, flowing manner. In redoing the previous owner's attempt I was surprised to see poor soldering and crimp techniques, the mating of large gauge wire to small gauge, and wire taps too close to connectors.

Anyway, I separated the wire bundle and created three sub-harnesses: a harness out of the servo, a harness out of the control panel and one that ties the both together. All +12 volt signal wires have connectors installed and I went through a relay. I used a quick disconnect adapter set instead of the Y-harness to clean up the coil area. I tucked the noise suppressor on the blue wire in between the frame and coil. Next comes the electrical tests. In looking at the pictures does anyone have any opinion in what I did ?





























~~~

Updated thumbnails of the install. Added schematic with kind permission from Dan Bergmen (www.bergmenengineering.com)

After looming and rerouting the wires, I test rode. Pressed "on,” green light lit up, push "set" and CC did not take.

Per the schematic troubleshooting guide, with ignition on, all switches operate as stated. Purple wire did not ground so I added a relay per the schematic. With the ignition on, continuity is now present when brake is released, verified w/ ohmmeter.

I tried setting the dip-switches two ways and both don’t work:
*1st: 1 on, 2 off, 3 off, 4 on, 5 off, 6 off, 7 on (as shown in the picture)
*2nd: 1 on, 2 off, 3 on, 4 off, 5 off, 6 off, 7 off

When CC is on, red LED on circuit board lights up when "set,” "res,” and "brake" is applied. With engine at idle, LED slowly blinks and speeds up with acceleration.

Is this still electrical or mechanical? The cable appears to be routed correctly with no binding. There is vacuum at the servo port but have no idea what constitutes enough vacuum. No vacuum canister was installed but did notice a large amount of hose used and coiled underneath the air-box.

Since everything appears to operate normal, could it be the motherboard? Diaphragm in the servo? Replace or repair the servo?

I really would like to make the CC work but I'm not going to spend much more time on this. Any thoughts would be helpful.

PS: found this link discussing problem (http://ecomodder.com/forum/showthread.php/audiovox-ccs-100-cruise-control-replacement-cant-do-4078.html)







~~~

For those of you who are curious on what is inside the Audiovox. Pretty simple set up.

The diaphragm looked good, no cracks or tears. It appears to be of good material, one that will last through temperature and time. Will test to verify it is air tight

Will energize the solenoids to see if they operate. After everything I have done I am convinced it is something in the servo that is not working. Board seems to be fine with no damaged or burnt components.

























43
Comments by John Oosterhuis, STOC #1058:

This is an excellent article, thanks Paul!

It's good to know that the unit can be opened up.  Jim Neagle, STOC #8083, used Paul's pictures and description to fix his AudioVox which had stopped engaging.  Just a bit of oil on the sticking vacuum solenoid was all that it took!  Saved Jim from buying a whole new unit.

44
AudioVox Cruise Tutorial ( CCS-100 ) - ST1100\ST1300 - continued

After re-verifying point-to-point wiring was OK, +12VDC signals was measured to the board connector, the diaphragm and chamber held vacuum, and the board showed no evidence of damage; energizing the solenoids indicated the vac solenoid was stuck. After several hits with 12VDC, it loosened itself up. A drop of light machine oil in each port, connect it back to the bike, lock the throttle at 3000 RPM, hit on and set, voila!, all valves actuated. This could work. Re-assemble the servo, reset dip switches to the default mode, hook everything up, test ride and... it's alive! The CC works; on, set, accelerate, coast, off when brake is applied, resume; it's all there. Yea!!! Sometimes it takes digging deeper to solve the problem.

Here is what I learned during this process:
  • Be careful disassembling the servo, tabs are easily broken off, especially the diaphragm chamber. I used five small metal tabs to take the top off. Go slow.
  • When mating the the lower and upper servo halves, place the three small o-rings into the solenoid ports and not to the chamber tubes. It makes for effortless seating and the tabs click together easier. Once again be careful and work slowly, you don't want to break any of those tabs.
  • Take your time in routing the wires and don't be afraid to cut the excess off. Routing the harness out of harms way pays off big. Loom your wires to prevent exposed wires.
  • When looming and using the cowl stay (frame) as a routing & anchor point, it is best to assemble the inner cowling. I had to re-position the wiring slightly and to the inside so it could slip past and meet with the main outer cowl. The convoluted tubing adds protection but also adds bulk.
  • After all the plastic was on, I noticed the vent opening where the mirror meets the fairing and thought of all the dust, grime, water, and insect ingress that could potentially wreak havoc to the electrical connections and servo so I chose to block it off. A plastic folder bought at Staples provided the right thickness and was trimmed and placed between mirror and fairing.

Well that's it. Fabricate a bracket and it's time to ride; I want to test the CC on its staying power on a long trip.











~~~

Bracketing done, project finished!

I brought the bike up to 75mph and with the modest slopes and valleys of our North TeXas highway system, the speed has held remarkably steady. When, with future maintenance, it is required to remove the airbox I will look at adding a vacuum canister but for now I am incredibly happy that the unit functions at it should.

Ride safe.



~~~

Thank You again for your contribution Paul Wilhelm, aka NikonHonda, STOC #8598
45
ST1100 Archive of Wisdom / AudioVox Cruise Tutorial ( CCS-100 ) - ST1100\ST1300 *
« Last post by KoTAOW on May 31, 2012, 04:56:59 PM »
Submitted by Paul Wilhelm, aka NikonHonda, STOC #8598
Original article can be found here:  http://www.st-owners.com/forums/showthread.php?112500-Need-opinion-on-CC-wiring-re-do

~~~

AudioVox Cruise Tutorial ( CCS-100 ) - ST1100\ST1300

When I bought my 2004 ST1300, the Audiovox CC was not working so I tied up the wires and told myself it was for another time. The bike is at rest for three weeks so I decided to upgrade the headlamps and move the lights off the forks to the mirror area but that is for another post. I had all the plastic off and I looked at the CC and decided it was time.

Having experience in electro-mechanical assembly, I am meticulous in looming and routing wires in a tidy, flowing manner. In redoing the previous owner's attempt I was surprised to see poor soldering and crimp techniques, the mating of large gauge wire to small gauge, and wire taps too close to connectors.

Anyway, I separated the wire bundle and created three sub-harnesses: a harness out of the servo, a harness out of the control panel and one that ties the both together. All +12 volt signal wires have connectors installed and I went through a relay. I used a quick disconnect adapter set instead of the Y-harness to clean up the coil area. I tucked the noise suppressor on the blue wire in between the frame and coil. Next comes the electrical tests. In looking at the pictures does anyone have any opinion in what I did ?





























~~~

Updated thumbnails of the install. Added schematic with kind permission from Dan Bergmen (www.bergmenengineering.com)

After looming and rerouting the wires, I test rode. Pressed "on,” green light lit up, push "set" and CC did not take.

Per the schematic troubleshooting guide, with ignition on, all switches operate as stated. Purple wire did not ground so I added a relay per the schematic. With the ignition on, continuity is now present when brake is released, verified w/ ohmmeter.

I tried setting the dip-switches two ways and both don’t work:
*1st: 1 on, 2 off, 3 off, 4 on, 5 off, 6 off, 7 on (as shown in the picture)
*2nd: 1 on, 2 off, 3 on, 4 off, 5 off, 6 off, 7 off

When CC is on, red LED on circuit board lights up when "set,” "res,” and "brake" is applied. With engine at idle, LED slowly blinks and speeds up with acceleration.

Is this still electrical or mechanical? The cable appears to be routed correctly with no binding. There is vacuum at the servo port but have no idea what constitutes enough vacuum. No vacuum canister was installed but did notice a large amount of hose used and coiled underneath the air-box.

Since everything appears to operate normal, could it be the motherboard? Diaphragm in the servo? Replace or repair the servo?

I really would like to make the CC work but I'm not going to spend much more time on this. Any thoughts would be helpful.

PS: found this link discussing problem (http://ecomodder.com/forum/showthread.php/audiovox-ccs-100-cruise-control-replacement-cant-do-4078.html)







~~~

For those of you who are curious on what is inside the Audiovox. Pretty simple set up.

The diaphragm looked good, no cracks or tears. It appears to be of good material, one that will last through temperature and time. Will test to verify it is air tight

Will energize the solenoids to see if they operate. After everything I have done I am convinced it is something in the servo that is not working. Board seems to be fine with no damaged or burnt components.

























46
ST1100 Archive of Wisdom / Re: Clutch Diode Information ( ST1100 )
« Last post by KoTAOW on May 04, 2012, 05:06:16 PM »
OEM diode pack can be replaced using general purpose diodes available at Radio Shack or any other electronic component source.

Radio Shack:   http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2062578

1N5402 or # 276-1143

3 amp, 200 v PIV

$1.69 each.

~~~

Need two diodes ( 1N5402 )


and some insulated crimp terminals ( 3 x red ).


Twist together the cathodes ( banded end ) and crimp on an insulated terminal.

Crimp insulated terminals to each of the remain anodes ( Un-banned end )

Looking at wiring diagram below:


The end with the twisted leads into a single insulated terminal connect to the GREEN wire.

The remaining diode ends connect to the GREEN\RED wire and the other wire.
47
ST1300 Archive of Wisdom / Re: Quartet Harness Installation ( ST1300 )
« Last post by KoTAOW on May 03, 2012, 03:34:39 PM »
Honda Quartet Harness Installation Instructions

Installation Instructions ( PDF )
48
ST1100 Archive of Wisdom / Homemade Deflector Farkle Set ( ST1100 ) *
« Last post by KoTAOW on April 28, 2012, 07:22:15 PM »
Submitted by Mike Breton, STOC #7966
Original article can be found here:  http://www.st-owners.com/forums/showthread.php?51340-ST1100-10-Homemade-deflector-farkle-set

~~~

Homemade Deflector Farkle Set ( ST1100 )



I wanted some temporary wind deflectors for my 3600 mile ride to Key West and back to New England in chilly October (I leave this Friday). So here’s a brief write up of how I saved money by making my own using a shoestring budget, elbow grease, and 1 hour.

Stopped at Lowe's and picked up about 10 dollars in supplies.

* Plexiglas®
* Industrial double sided sticky foam
* Cheap plain ceramic tiles.

Plus tools I already own.

* Dremel®
* Leatherman®
* Cardboard
* Sharpie®



First you make the part out of cardboard before any cutting is done.

Then trace your cardboard design on the piece.

Score the Plexiglas® and break it to the desired size.



Now you can use the Dremel® tool to carve the shape out of the Plexiglass®.



Once the piece is cut out, you can bend it to the right angle.

I bought 2 cheap pieces of plain tile and placed them a inch apart on top of a burner. A wider gap makes a rounder bend. Turn the burner to just past medium and hold the plexiglass close till it becomes pliable over the gap. Then gently bend to just past the desired angle, it will relax to the angle you want as it cools.

WARNING: use safety protection, ceramic tiles may explode if they have a bubble hidden in them.

WARNING: I am told glazed tile emit lead when heated, so use Unglazed Quarry Tile (Look for Fireclay brand, or "All natural clay and shale" or "Lead-Free").

Tip: Cool pieces in fridge before removing protective plastic film, it will come off a lot easier.
Tip: Remember to bend the left and the right side in opposite directions.



Plexiglass® is fragile, careful you do not bend too far, or you will have to restart like I did.



Now affix the double sided sticky foam to the piece.



Install and enjoy.



NOTE:  The pieces installed over the mirrors to deflect the wind that would otherwise beat down on my fingers. The pieces easily slip between the mirror and the mirror cover. They are too thin to be permanent, a curious passerby could snap them off with little effort. I also threw on a couple simple shin guards.

Should you wish for a little more longevity, I would make them using Lexan. It is twice as hard to break, bend, and cut. But should last the life of the bike.

~~~

UPDATE:
I would definitely remake them with better material next time. Probably Lexan®. But I was covered head to toe with gear, so if they shattered it would not phase me.

They held up, except when turning around in a dark parking lot in Florida I was surprised to find out it was not a parking lot, but a field of smooth beach sand gobbling my front wheel.

Quick reaction sprung my legs out and saved my bike but my leg hit the right shin shield and broke the corner off, so 45 degree them next time.

Also, I am very glad I had them because the last day of the trip it hit zero degrees outside all the way from NY to Eastern MA. Burrr! So much pain, buying heated gloves before the fall, and that's a promise.

~~~

Thank You again for your contribution Mike Breton, STOC #7966
49
ST1100 Archive of Wisdom / Re: Mirror Wind Deflectors, Do It Yourself ( ST1100 )
« Last post by KoTAOW on April 25, 2012, 06:46:58 AM »
Comments by Norm Keller, STOC #8030:

Mine are made from 1/16" clear Lexan® and are held by double sided tape although did attach them by "Dum-Dum" (strip putty for body sealing), either seems to suffice. I like to use attachment which doesn't increase the break-away effort for the mirror covers too much.
50
ST1100 Archive of Wisdom / Mirror Wind Deflectors, Do It Yourself ( ST1100 ) *
« Last post by KoTAOW on April 23, 2012, 08:39:06 AM »
Submitted by Patrick O'Bryant, aka sirepair, STOC #7105
Original article can be found here:  El-Cheapo-Mirror-Wind-Deflectors

~~~

Mirror Wind Deflectors, Do It Yourself ( ST1100 )

Made these up last year but never got around to do a write-up, so here is the belated one:

OK, so I'm a pretty frugal guy and dangerous with sharp objects, so I made a set of Mirror Wind Deflectors for my ST1100. I have the fairing deflectors (bought used) but did not get the mirror deflectors. I utilized a $10.00 set of generic mud flaps from my local auto parts store.

I played around with some card board to get the shape right, then hacked out the shapes from the plastic using a box knife. I left the textured side up to go along with the gray plastic parts (though the mud flaps are black).

I had to bevel the edges a bit to get a tight fit. For this I utilized a drum sander bit on my Dremel tool. BE CAREFUL as the course drums will remove a lot of material from the mud flaps quite quickly! Maybe practice on a piece of scrap first...

I did not want to mount them with fasteners so I tried to mount them (last year) with some 2-sided molding tape. But I think my tape was old and I had some issues with it sticking. So I utilized some black silicone (RTV). Took a bit of elbow grease to remove the remaining RTV once I removed the deflectors for summer riding.

This time, I'm using a GE bathroom caulk (goes on white, dries clear) and hopefully it will be a bit easier to remove. I simply ran a bead around the 2 edges of the deflectors that will stick to the fairing and mirror.

**UPDATE** Use Permatex black RTV for easier removal. The GE stuff was a P.I.T.A. to remove!

Using some masking tape and a clamps I positioned the deflectors and left them to dry overnight.

I was pretty happy with both the looks and function of this farkle. The deflectors do a good job of keeping wind and rain off of my hands. And at about $13.00 ($10 mud flaps, $3 silicone) it's hard to go wrong!

And so ends another episode of "the Frugal Farkler"!! Tune in next time when I make a RAM ball GPS mount from a goat's testicle.....

~~~











~~~

Left side.


Right side.


NOTE:  PDF file attached below with scale trace of deflectors

~~~

Thank You again for your contribution Patrick O'Bryant, aka sirepair, STOC #7105
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